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Thread: Group-C real life info

  1. #1

    Group-C real life info

    Hi, I posted this on the old forum, so I'll put it here again.


    This is a very interesting article about the Sauber C9 (use the same engine than the C11) and how the boost was used. It looks like the boost and engine temp and durability were very associated.

    http://www.uniquecarsmag.com.au/news...eid/69192.aspx

    Boost is adjustable via a dial across 10 positions, located on the far left of the cabin. There are eight positions of useable boost, ranging from zero, which is 0.4bar, incrementally through to eight, which produces 1.0bar and the maximum used under racing conditions, and even then only if really needed. Keep turning the dial past there and you encounter two additional settings, described by chief mechanic and collection manager Ben Hanson as being “one bar and a bit!” According to Ben, the last two settings are practically off limits.

    “They are basically qualifying boost,” he explains. “If they ran the engine on the last setting, they used to drive it for one lap then they’d effectively have to change the engine. Things start to get very hot very quickly, with turbo temperatures building to 1000 degrees, and things basically start melting. A harnessed driver in the C9 can’t reach the dial, and that’s all in the making!”

  2. #2
    About competition, how are the fuel consumption and tire wear planned? Now to fill the tank with 100 litres it take just 15 seconds. That short time kills any fuel saving strategy. There will be two different kind of slick tires? I been able to do an entire stint of 100 litres with one set of tires without problem, but then the tires lose his performance, so it's not a good deal to double stint the tires. Related with my previous post, how the turbo boost will provide power and rise the fuel consumption.

    I think that's key to get good competition in endurance events.
    Last edited by Damian Baldi; 05-08-2014 at 06:06 PM.

  3. #3
    I am not sure exactly how things are going there. I will have to check with our physics guys and let them answer this for you.

  4. #4
    The Porche 962 it's the perfect platform to handicap drivers for an endurance event with just a few physics changes. Using the same graphic base you can add or remove weight, or add or remove power, increase or decrease fuel consumption to get two or three different performance cars emulating GTP, C1 and C1 "work" cars.

    https://www.stuttcars.com/porsche-models/962/

    As I told you, I will meet Oscar Larrauri in a few days, he drove ALL the 962 models from mid 80s to early 90s, so I can ask him about the different performances of each car.

  5. #5
    About the pit stops I think it took a second per litre to fill the tank. With these values, you can point your strategy to save fuel and gain time if you are driving a slow car, every litre that you save using longer gears, or low boost, it's a second less at the pits.
    Last edited by Damian Baldi; 06-08-2014 at 04:24 AM.

  6. #6
    Basically any information that can be given will be a plus for us. Its hard to acquire a lot of data and having a real driver's notes on various parts of the car will be great. How it drove, what were the typical stints for the short races and then for the 24 hour races. Were the engines different in performance for the 24 hour races as they had to run for that long compared to the shorter races? Fuel loads, tire wear, how long it took tires to heat up, to get to peak, to start dropping off.

    Things of this nature really helps out to make these cars as accurate as possible. Of course any information you get will help a lot.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Petros Mak View Post
    Basically any information that can be given will be a plus for us. Its hard to acquire a lot of data and having a real driver's notes on various parts of the car will be great. How it drove, what were the typical stints for the short races and then for the 24 hour races. Were the engines different in performance for the 24 hour races as they had to run for that long compared to the shorter races? Fuel loads, tire wear, how long it took tires to heat up, to get to peak, to start dropping off.

    Things of this nature really helps out to make these cars as accurate as possible. Of course any information you get will help a lot.
    That's all I have in mind and more. Let see how friendly he is that day. At the moment, I asked him by facebook about the cars, and he started talking about how he configured the 962C for the 1990 race to get the second place at the start, just behind the Nissan R90CK with that record lap.

  8. #8
    Ah nice, well looking forward to any feedback that can be provided, thank you very much for helping us out with this too.

  9. #9
    Interesting actual video onboard from a Mazda 787. The most interesting thing about this video, it the amount of time that the gearbox takes to change from gear to gear. Watch it from minute 8.

    Last edited by Damian Baldi; 23-08-2014 at 05:11 PM.

  10. #10
    Great video showing the top speed on the old Le Mans straight.

    Comments on the video, say that it's an old Dome RB83 from 1983



    The RC83 video is very interesting for some things. First and more notorious is the brutal speed than never stop rising. Second is the (at least on the video) fairly easy handling of the car, the driver doesn't need to correct the car all the time as in the R90CK video from 1990. Finally the long time between downshifts at the end of the long straight.
    Last edited by Damian Baldi; 23-08-2014 at 07:50 PM.

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